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  • Jakob Richards

Online MLB Content to Keep Us Entertained and Help the Sport Grow

With the current state of the world and sports, it's easy to find ourselves in need of entertainment content and it's harder to find said content. With the MLB season being postponed for at least a few months, and with a lot more free time on our hands, I thought I'd share some great sources of MLB content that I personally enjoy and I think you will too! In these different times, I find it even MORE important than usual to consume as much online content as possible in hopes to keep the sport growing despite the lack of active games.


In terms of watching games, we obviously can't watch any new ones, but watching older games is really fun and they're usually easy to find. The MLB has released thousands of classic games ranging from all eras, these games can be found entirely free of charge at the YouTube page, MLB Vault. So far I've watched 5 amazing games ranging from Game 2 of the 1990 World Series to Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS. If you're looking for more modern games and highlights, the MLB YouTube page is a better source than the MLB Vault. I'm about to watch the full 2019 Home-Run Derby! In general, the best way to find games and highlights in any way is to just use the search bar on YouTube and be as specific as possible, the above links are just MLB YouTube channels that archive the games and provide them to users for free.


Another great option to find MLB content is to use MLB.com's new video search function. This search function allows the user to access over 3 million MLB clips, and it gives the user a great many options and variables to search from. This search function is incredibly well designed, with up to 31 different options to edit your search. Regardless of our individual and personal use of it, this new multimedia search function is GREAT for baseball as a whole. It provides a simple way for media teams and content creators to legally access/share so many MLB clips, leading to (what would normally be) more online MLB content and the expansion of the sport.


Personally, I most enjoy listening to MLB-related podcasts, and they're a great source of online MLB content. Currently, I like to listen to the Starting9 podcast (a product of Barstool Sports), this brings big-league perspectives into a fun and news related style of podcast. I also love to listen to a smaller and more stats-related podcast called Framing the Conversation; part of what makes this podcast unique is that it is hosted by a full-time MLB writer and current college undergrad, Devan Fink! One final podcast recommendation is more general than just the MLB, but still very important nonetheless; the podcast Champions of Change: The RISE Podcast is a short and excellent podcast about the role of racial and identity-based equity in sports. All of these podcasts can be found on all major podcast platforms, like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, etc.


The final way I'd recommend fulfilling your MLB needs is to simply follow the MLB, and your favorite players/clubs, on social media! The MLB Twitter and Instagram accounts remain very active in this time and are providing new ways to entertain fans. The MLB account facilitated a challenge for fans to create a lineup of their all-time best players. Current players like Jack Flaherty, Christian Yelich, Luke Voit, and many more participated in sharing their lineups. Players are just as bored as we are and they're all sharing fun content with their fans and followers to entertain us and themselves. Wilson Contreras used a nerf gun for batting practice, Giancarlo Stanton retweeted a funny video of a little kid bat-flipping, and Freddie Freeman hit a bomb off of his toddler-aged kid and the reaction was priceless.


I would really encourage you to follow and interact with the social media accounts of the players, teams, and sports sources you personally enjoy. Although we all use social media differently, these platforms allow whatever sport you like to grow as a cultural presence, and being a part of that digital media interaction is important for that growth.


If anyone has any other recommendations for online content related to the MLB or any sport, feel free to comment below and keep the conversation going!